The Slowdown and Timmy Time

I’ve noticed a couple of things here on WordPress, as far as beer blogging goes anyway.  Number one is that the number of views that my blog is getting is starting to slump noticeably.  Number two, the activity of the beer bloggers that I follow is also slumping.  There are a couple of authors that still routinely post and make for interesting reading, but I would say that about 80-90% of the blogs I follow have been inactive for more than a couple of months and quite a few that I believe have just been abandoned.  There seems to be a pattern where someone starts a blog, so excited about getting into homebrewing, but that excitement (at least about blogging) fizzles out rather quickly.  Such is life I guess.  Anyway, the combination of these two things is beginning to make my experience as a blogger far less interesting.  I’ve been doing this now for a while, but it’s becoming an issue of diminishing returns.  I’m not abandoning the blog yet, but I feel I’m waning a bit.  I must be honestly objective with myself though.  Maybe number one is due to the fact that I may not be that interesting.

On a side note, here’s some more uninteresting stuff.  I brewed Timmy Time Lime Cream Ale last Friday.  This was batch #5 of 2015 and the second time I’ve brewed this beer.  Last year it was a 2.5 gallon batch.  This time, I upscaled to five gallons.  Brew day was as smooth as could be until I tried to cool the batch with my copper immersion chiller.  I turned on the water and no water was exiting out of the chiller.  My only guess was that there was a blockage.  Possibly a very small bug had climbed in while the chiller had been sitting in my garage.  So I kept squeezing the supply side of the tube leading to the chiller to create a pump like action to dislodge whatever was in there.  Finally a small twig popped out.  Automatically I suspected one of my kids.  Sneaky little devils!  But who knows for sure because they’ll never cop to the crime.

Timmy Time Lime Cream Ale (5 gallon BIAB)

Grist:

82.5% Rahr 2-Row

5.8% Carapils

5.8% Flaked Barley

5.8 % Flaked Corn

Water to grist Ratio:  2.0

Mash:  152F for 75 min

Sparge:  2 gallons @170F

Hops:  Cluster 8.1%AA (0.4 oz @ 45min, 0.2 oz @ 15min)

Other:  1 oz Lime Peel @ 10min

Yeast:  Safale US-05

OG:  1.045 (target), 1.051 (actual)

Target ABV:  5%

Target IBUs: 16.03

SRM:  3.59

This is intended to be a refreshing cream ale that you’d enjoy in the summer on a boat or at the beach.  Light, citrusy, refreshing.  Next up at the beginning of May is the brew day for Witty Kitty Witbier.  Erika and I will be brewing this together on May 2, which coincidentally is National Homebrew Day.

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I also took the opportunity to do a taste check on the Kriek that’s been in secondary for over 2 months now.  It has a really nice dark red appearance from the cherry puree.  There is some acidity and a very very subtle funk.  Other than that it is hard to describe.  But it does have the same ballpark character of Rodenbach.  Really what I was checking for here is that it didn’t turn into some putrid, vinegary lost cause.  Luckily that’s not the case.  So I’m going to let it go the remainder of its six months in secondary and then bottle.

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And here are pictures of the finished products of the rye and bourbon ales.  They look very similar due to the similar amount of Caramel 40 used in each (about 8.5%).  But I just love that color.

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9 comments on “The Slowdown and Timmy Time

  1. jethrobrewing says:

    I have had my blog for 3 years now and ran into the same issues you’re talking about. Now I have gone long strides without posts, however sometimes that’s do to beers/tasting notes taking longer than expected or laziness of the brewer.

  2. RDub says:

    Not that I ever had a lot of views, but I have noticed fewer as well.

    My blogging, like my brewing, falls victim to life. The demands of work, family, and now with the warmer weather, yard work, leaves little time and less energy to blog.

    Interesting assortment of beer that you make, by the way.

    • Pride Craft says:

      Thanks RDub. I guess I’m lucky in the fact that my schedule allows me to carve out time routinely for brewing (and the quick post). I do sympathize with those that have a more hectic life. Regarding my beers, I like to hit on an assortment of styles because I want to brew something for everybody since everybody’s preferences/palates are different. I love IPAs but I only have a couple of friends that do to, so if that’s all I brewed, I would miss out on sharing what I create with the rest of my family and friends. Plus I feel that doing a lot of different styles challenges me as a brewer.

  3. BB says:

    I’m sad to read you’re down hearted about your blog, but pleased to hear that your Kriek is all good! It’s a fave of mine…and the fact you’re home brewing it it really interesting. Is it a hard one to get right? (Sorry if thats a dim question. I love ale but not totally into the home brew side yet! )

    • Pride Craft says:

      Thanks for commenting BB. The kriek isn’t necessarily harder to make than any other homebrew. It just takes so long to age and develop fully (letting the unique bugs do their unique thing compared to just plain old brewer’s yeast). This is my first attempt though, so I’ll feel very fortunate if it’s drinkable in the end.

      • BB says:

        Fingers crossed that those bugs do their thing then. And stick with the blog for a bit longer. I’ve only just found you!

  4. I really enjoy reading your posts and I hope you keep it up. You do a great job describing your beers and process. I plan on stealing much of what I read here 🙂

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